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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 55
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English 55
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)
devastation caused by superstorm sandy. >> i think the most likely explanation here is sandy's impact was significant but was so short-lived that it didn't extend to the sample period of the employment report which was the week that covered november 12. >> reporter: hiring was also supposed to be weak due to worries about the fiscal cliff. with $600 billion in automatic tax hikes and government spending cuts set to start next year, why aren't more firms postponing hiring decisions? >> what we're hearing from businesses is that it is really hard to actually pull back hiring right now, because they've already fired so many workers, gotten so lean that it's really difficult. >> reporter: but not all the surprises in the report were good. at 7.7%, the unemployment rate hit its lowest level since december 2008. but that was mostly due to people giving up their search for work. and there's another disappointing trend, weak wage growth. >> what we are not seeing is strong income generation. the slowing in wage gains-- the weak bargaining power of labor comes across in this report and >> repo
: still ahead, the hurricane sandy relief concert tonight that's expected to raise tens of millions of dollars. how safe is your money when you give it away to a charity? >> tom: the federal reserve continuing to pump money in the economy, always brings up concerns about inflation, but many commodity prices remain below the current prices. lincoln is with us from the c.m.e. group in chicago. what do you think the federal reserve's actions today and the worries about the economy, say about commodity demand in the next year? >> it looks as though the federal reserve thinks the commodity demand will continue to be weak. in fact, as you rightly point out, many commodities off their recent highs made in late august, early september, continue to suggest that the demand picture, the actual structural issues that ben bernanke and the team are worried about are still very much in play. a very weak economy means weak demand in the commodity complex. >> tom: it sounds like the commodities are responding to the economics, as opposed to all of the money the federal reserve is flooding into the m
close to $5 a gallon for gasoline, of course it was because of hurricane sandy and standing in line, gas lines, and now this. i know it is a special situation, but what is going on here? >> well, that was a special situation, it was incredible disruption of the supply chain to the northeast, if you recall, only northern new jersey had to endure the odd, even rationing it shows you how isolated that was, but what is going on here, suze is that the united states is in the process of becoming energy independent, it is in the process of surpassing saudi arabia as the world's number one producer of oil. because of the shale drilling that going on, mostly in the middle of the country. there is also a massive expansion of a big refinery down in texas, that the saudis are working on with royal dutch shell and the industry is refiguring the infrastructure zero to get more of that mid continent middle of the country oil down to the gulf coast where we could see a tremendous price break next year. >> that is really amazing stuff, let's look at some of the numbers on gas and oil and your outlook, i
city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close or directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for
, fewer than in october. the blame for last month's slowdown in hiring falls squarely on hurricane sandy, not on any new or widespread weakness in the economy. >> i would expect that by december, we're going to see some bounce back. much of the disruption from sandy was people simply not being able to get to work or firms not employing people that they ordinarily would have. >> reporter: friday, the government will report it's monthly snapshot of the u.s. labor market. it, too, is likely to reflect temporary effects related to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. >> we're looking for only a 50,000 gain in jobs in november, well under that 170,000 average we've seen over the past three months. >> reporter: hurricane sandy's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again. but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq from gains. by the c
storm sandy appear to be passing. new claims fell by 25,000 in the week ending december 1 to a lower than expected 370,000 requests. that's raising hopes about november's jobs data, which is due out tomorrow. grey, and christmas says u.s. employment firm challenger, grey, and christmas says u.s. companies announced 57,000 job cuts last month. separately, the number of planned job cuts rose 20% in november from october's levels. on wall street, the dow rose 39 points, but the nasdaq added 15, the s&p up nearly five. >> reporter: i'm erika miller in new york. coming up tonight, we'll talk to the c.e.o. of kitchen store sur la table and get his outlook for holiday sales. >> tom: lots of theatrics today, but few visible signs of progress in washington towards a fix for the fiscal cliff. the only hopeful sign is that republicans and democrats are talking privately again. but they haven't worked out any of the big issues, including what to do about the nation's debt limit. washington will hit its borrowing limit early next year, darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: sitting around the
sandy, raising health concerns. >> everybody sort of got sick at the same time. all of us sort of attributed it to, well, we're all stressed out. it's very cold. but that said, there is a lot of nasty stuff hanging about. >> ifill: and hari sreenivasan has an update on the dangerous working conditions in bangladesh, where more than 100 workers have died over the past month. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: president obama made another foray outside washington today, trying to build public support for a fiscal cliff agreement. it came a day after he resumed talking wit
first graders killed at sandy hook elementary. townspeople are still reeling. >> really sad. i didn't want to go back to work today. it hit me hard because i got two kids too. the same age that happened to these kids. it really hit hard, like a parent, like a dad. >> suarez: a somber weekend had concluded with last night's vigil at newtown high school about a mile away from the scene of the killings. ( applause ) police and emergency personnel got a standing ovation as they entered the auditorium. president obama met privately with the victims' families before addressing the shaken crowd. >> i can only hope it helps for you to know that you're not alone in your grief. that our world too has been torn apart, that all across this land of ours we have went with you. we pulled our children tight. and you must know that whatever measure of comfort we can provide, we will provide. whatever portion of sadness that we can share with you to ease this heavy load, we will gladly bear. newtown, you are not alone. >> suarez: the weekend also brought new details in the the investigation. police c
-inflicted gunshot wounds, and that his older brother is being questioned by authorities. the school, sandy hook elementary, is home to children from kindergarten through fourth grade. the violent episode shook students and their families in the small newtown community, 65 miles northeast of new york city. >> we were running really quick, so then we got to the firehouse and we sat in our classes, and i am really happy we are out alive. >> it doesn't even seem real, it just does not seem like it's even possible. you read it in the paper or see it in the news, and you're like, "oh, my god, that poor family." and then, you have something happen so close to home, it's like... i think i'm still in shock, to be honest with you. >> suarez: and connecticut governor dannel malloy addressed the shooting late this afternoon. >> you can never be prepared for this kind of incident. what has happened, what has transpired at that school building will leave a mark on this community and every family impacted. >> suarez: today's occurrence in connecticut is the latest mass shooting this year. most notably, in jul
of six-year-old james mattioli, one of the slain first graders from sandy hook elementary school. hours later, a church bell tolled as mourners greeted another small white casket at the funeral for jessica rekos, also six. (bell tolling). meanwhile, students from other local schools returned to class. in buses adorned with ribbons bearing sandy hook's colors, police were on hand as were counselors. >> making the kids safe and happy. that's all we're here for. is to make sure that they are safe and happy. >> suarez: sandy hook itself remains closed. plans call for its students to be sent to a now vacant school in nearby monroe, but it was unclear when. back in washington, a string of democratic members of congress took to the house floor calling for new gun legislation. >> thank you, mr. speaker. we need to pass bold, necessary, overdue gun control legislation. if we do not, this will happen again. >> 20 innocents and their six teachers. more tears. more burials. but will we heed its meaning? will we break the gun lobby's spell? >> suarez: outside the capital, the head of the brady campa
than expected in the wake of hurricane sandy and fiscal cliff anxiety. >> so it looks like sandy will not affect the numbers even after revisions. >> reporter: georgetown's harry holzer, former chief economist for the labor department. >> in terms of the fiscal cliff, so far we are not seeing any big impact. >> reporter: not even an impact on retail which, for all the talk of online supplanting bricks-and-mortar buying, added 53,000 jobs last month-- much of it holiday hiring, no doubt-- but a healthy 140,000 overall increase in the past three months. not all the new numbers were festive, however. construction shed 20,000 jobs, though perhaps influenced by sandy. manufacturing dropped 7,000. grinchier still, job growth in september and october was revised down by 49,000 jobs. and for all the talk of a lower unemployment rate, its explanation seemed to be that several hundred thousand more americans stopped looking for work in november and were counted out of the labor force. again, economist holtzer. >> this month's change was driven completely by the fact some people stopped loo
will that affect the outlook for next year. we'll ask b.m.o asset management's sandy lincoln. he's this week's "market monitor" guest. and why a new program to help student loan borrowers could mean a big win for high earners with graduate degrees. >> its medical marijuana business is a $2 billion a year industry already. it's projected to more than quad are you nell the next four years. but now colorado and washington state residents can use marijuana without a doctor's permission. while they are still breaking federal law, what impact could these new state laws have on the medical dope business? we have more of our recent conversation with tripp keber, c.e.o. of medical marijuana products maker dixie elixirs. >> you are looking at a $300 million in denver going to in excess of $600 million, this is about taxes, this is about jobs. the state of colorado we paid into a state coffers as an industry over $50 million in taxes, licenses and fees. we employ as an industry directly over 10,000 people in the state. and so there are not many states that can afford to turn a blind eye to that. so i c
be exacerbated by global warming, any time? >> you know, it's interesting, because i think hurricane sandy really woke a lot of people up about the risk of rising sea level in the future for coastal communities. 75% of california residents live within an hour of the coast. and, you know, basically the ocean has already risen eight inches in the last 100 years. we can measure that by the tidal gauge at ft. point in san francisco which has sat there more than 100 years. the same gauge, the same water. these are not al gore's theories. these are measurable phenomenon, empirical data. as the ocean continues to rise, we're going to see more days like these high water events. so there's a non-profit group called the california king tides initiative. and there are similar ones in oregon, washington, british columbia, that asks people to go out and photograph this phenomena before and after and post it on websites so you can see what the future is going to be like. >> david, you had a question? >> yeah, we also had some flooding down here because of the king tides. paul, i'm wondering about how do you st
at sandy hook elementary school does not happen again. on friday december 14th a gunman killed 26 people, 20 of them were children between the ages of 6 and 7. it is the second deadliest mass shooting in american history. the killings have revived the debate on gun control and demonstrated the need to rethink our approach to mental illness. president obama traveled to the bereaved town to attend a community vigil and console families. here is a part of the president's address to the grieving people of that town, and to the nation. >> no single law, no set of laws can eliminate evil or prevent every senseless act of violence in our society but that can't an excuse for inaction. surely we did:do better than this. if there's even one step we can take to save another child or another parent or another town, from the grief that's visited tucson, aurora, and oak creek and newtown, and communities from columbine to blacksberg before that, then surely we have an obligation to try. >> rose: joining me now is michael bloomberg. he's the mayor of new york city and he's also the co-chair of mayors a
. >> rose: damage from sandy is staggering. millions in the northeast struggle in the wake of hurricane sandy. >> the ravages of hurricane sandy remain a real and immediate problem in brooklyn. >> we support each other. we do what we can financially for each other but right now being scattered, it's hard. >> but on the whole, residents have risen to the challenge and restaurants have played an important role. >> we started cooking chicken for the people in the projects that were still home bound. >> almost -- someone just almost got run over. >> oh, here you, go perfect. hipsters and their hipster baby. >> he's a licensed new york city taxi driver. he gives food tours and he was our guide for the day. >> let's go. so our first stop is a little lunch counter. we're going to go -- it's certainly only jewish deli in the whole city that's closed for ramadan. so here we have to get brisket. so we get brisket on rye with gravy and a pastrami sandwich on rye with mustard. hey, how's it going? can we get a pastrami on rye with mustard, medium, please. >> wow, look at this. thank you. you can se
sandy which obviously affected millions of people and really caught the public's imaginationment but it didn't end. coverage of other hurricanes h there is a beginning, a middle and an end. the fact is what sandy did or seems to have done is to take the idea of climate change from an abstraction, something that scientists and experts debated, to something that millions of people along the east coast and in manhattan and staten island and the other boroughs in new york city experienced for themselves and it started a debate. we don't know obviously what the long-term consequences are, but it does suggest there is something different about this story and its long-term implications. >> woodruff: and it's interesting, michael, because we've had big storms in this country before. >> sure. >> woodruff: but there was something different about this one? >> i think people are getting a little more alert to it politically. and one thing that historians of the future do is if something terrible happens, if climate change over the next 50 years or so achieve great injury to this earth, histo
year, isaac in august and recently sandy. each storm brought a grim reminder of yet one more ever-present disaster: the deadly cholera epidemic that started ten months after the quake. at the cholera ward of saint luke's hospital just outside the capital port-au-prince, this doctor says since hurricane sandy admissions have doubled from 20 to 40 patients each day. >> most of the new cases are coming from further up the hill in places where we had not seen them before. i'm not positive but perhaps the wells there have been contaminated. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water for both washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have drop
26 times, once for each of the 20 children and six adults killed one week ago at sandy hook elementary school. mourners also gathered again at funerals and at makeshift memorials. >> i feel as though the first few days after this happened was really a feeling of numbness and shock. but now that's lifting a little bit and the reality is setting in, and it's very, very painful. >> suarez: at the white house, president obama observed a moment of silence with his staff, and church bells tolled across the country. the national cathedral in washington chimed 28 times for the school victims, and for the shooter, adam lanza, and his mother, nancy lanza. religious leaders at the observance called for congress to act on gun violence in the wake of the tragedy. >> if the killing of these 20 children will not move us to enact meaningful legislation that values god-given human life over an amendment crafted for a time and a nation that bears no resemblance to our own, then there is little hope for us. >> suarez: in a new video, the president said nearly 200,000 people have signed a petit
to life after the massacre at sandy hook in newtown, connecticut, ten days ago. on friday, the head of the national rifle association, wayne la pi oerriere called for armed guards in every school. that stance was met with awave of headlines and editorials that lampooned la pierre condemned the nra refusal to give any ground on gun control. but sunday on nbc's "meet the press" he was unrepentant. >> if it's crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our school to protect our children, then call me crazy. i tell what you the american people, i think the american people think it's crazy not to do it. it's the one thing that would keep people safe and the nra is going to try to do that. >> brown: on the same program, new york democrat senator chuck schumer called la pierre tone deaf. >> he blamed everything but guns, movies, the media, president obama, gun-free cool zones, you name it, the video games, he blames them. now, trying to prevent shootings in schools without talking about guns is like trying to prevent lung canger is without talking about cigarettes. >> brown:
nothing. >> ifill: instead, in the wake of the massacre at sandy hook elementary school, mr. obama said, "this time, the words need to lead to action" on gun violence. >> the vast majority of responsible law abiding gun owners would be some of the first to say that we should be able to keep an irresponsible law breaking few from buying a weapon of war. i'm willing to bet that they don't think that using a gun and using common sense are incompatible ideas. there is a big chunk of space between what the 2nd amendment means and having no rules at all. >> reporter: to that end, the president announced vice president biden and an administration team will craft recommendations on everything from gun laws to mental health, to be sent to congress by january. >> this is not some washington commission. this is not something where folks will be studying the issue for six months and publishing a report that gets read and then pushed aside. this is a team that has a very specific task-- the pull together real reforms right now. >> ifill: the president bristled at a suggestion that he took little act
of haverford trust joins us. >> tom: super storm sandy keeps showing up in some economic data. this time: consumer spending. spending fell 0.2% in october. it was expected to be up that much. stocks were mixed with continued nervousness about the fiscal cliff. the dow gained just three points, the nasdaq lost nearly two. the s&p 500 was virtually unchanged. on the week, the dow up just barely. the nasdaq the biggest gainer: up almost 1.5%, the s&p up half a percentage point. >> susie: investors took a bite out of yum brands today. the stock tumbled 10% after the parent of k.f.c. and pizza hut said its business in china is slowing. yum's c.e.o. warned that china sales will fall by 4% in the fourth quarter, that's a big drop from the same period a year ago when sales surged 21%. blaming the weak chinese economy, yum also said it plans to reduce the number of restaurant openings in the asian nation. yum operates roughly 5,000 restaurants in china, accounting for half of its total sales. >> susie: joining us now with more on the chinese consumer and the economy, nicholas consonery, asia anal
institute estimates insured losses from sandy will likely run around $19 billion, making it the third costliest natural disaster behind katrina and andrew. >> the cost of living is higher, houses are more expensive, so that's going to inflate our costs all the way around. >> reporter: insured losses are just one part of the equation. uninsured losses will likely run into the tens of billions of dollars. jim beukholt's is the third generation owner of the ben franklin shop. >> we didn't have flood insurance, so we have to take a loss on everything. >> reporter: sandra gerber's vacation home didn't have any flood insurance, either. nearly two feet of water means her recently remodeled home will have to be gutted. >> i don't have flood insurance. i don't have hurricane insurance. i just have the normal fire, theft liability. >> reporter: but with the high cost to rebuild, where everything from sheet rock to lumber are more expensive, residents worry that two big storms in two years will cause insurance premiums to rise and property values to decline. ruben ramirez, nbr, lavallette, new j
fire. sandy hook elementary school teaches ch >>> question. the federal assault weapons ban was a federal law in 1994. that law prohibited the manufacturing of semiautomatic firearms, so-called assault weapons, for civilian use. the ban was passed by congress on september 13th, 1994, and signed into law by president bill clinton. the 10-year law expired on september 13th, 2004. there have been multiple attempts to renew the weapons law ban but no bill has been legislated. will president obama revive the federal federal assault weapons ban? pat buchanan. >> john, the president had both houses of congress with him in 2009 for two years, and he didn't do it then. i doubt if he will try it now, but he may do it. but take a look at what happened up here. this individual came in and murdered his mother, who was a teacher, i believe of the kindergarten kids and may have murdered his father. you've got a did he meanted or insane individual who shouldn't have had any gun at all. but there were people that came to that school with assault weapons. all the first responders, the s.w.a.t
about when it comes to a picturesque holiday season. but clear skies, sandy beaches, and highs in the 70's? not so much. and when you think about holiday decorating, florida probably isn't the first place that comes to mind either, but the holiday decor business is doing quite well in the sunshine state. >> the clients we're calling on are the rich and famous. they're professional athletes, they're industry leaders, and we're in the business of complete sales, service and installation for these types of people. >> reporter: david shindler has been in the christmas business for more than 20 years. he's a franchisee at holiday decorating firm christmas decor. >> we'll custom decorate well over a couple hundred homes this year, and part of that is complete custom interiors and custom exteriors. >> reporter: if you want your house to look like this, you'll have to have a lot of this. prices start around $1,500, average $3,000, and can run as much as $20,000 for some of their bigger commercial clients. shindler describes this waterfront fort lauderdale home as one of the more modest residence
were hurricane sandy, which actually convinced a lot of people who were on the fence about climate change that the oceans really are rising and can affect us, not just polar bears, and the second big thing was the election. the re-election of obama locked in place the doubling of the gas mileage standards, new rules that are coming out on greenhouse gases, no more offshore oil drilling in new places, things that romney took a different view on. and in california there were three or four big environmental measures as well. voters in san francisco rejected overwhelmingly a measure that would have studied draining hetechi, i think setting back that movement decades, frankly. prop 37, the gm food thing, i think that sets back that movement. you know, they weren't able to make a compelling case to the public, even though they were out-spent, that genetically modified food is harmful to eat. i think that's part of the reason they lost. >> is that a victory for science or a defeat? >> we've been eating genetically modified food for 25 years, and there is not clear published in scientific
season. hurricane sandy. tragedy in ct. >> none of the events out there were feel good factor events. it was all for consumer morale. >> when you look at the weakness this holiday season, how much of the blame do you put on retailers for not having inspiring merchandise and how much of it are just factors beyond their control like the economy and the fiscal cliff? >> i think overall it was more probably 70 to 80% factors beyond the retailer's control. i think retailers had creative merchandise but i think the news didn't lead to a feel good factor. >> in any economy, good or bad, you always have some winners. who did really well this year? >> well, it looks like in terms of who did well so far, companies like american eagle outfitters limited, michael cors, macy's' tj and i would say costco was also a winner. >> on the flip side were there retailers that you had high hopes for going into the season but just didn't deliver in the end. >> certainly we will see some becoming more promotion al, some of the children's retailers, whether it was impacted by weather or there was competitive
by the architect of this model, sandy wiel, saying we should break up the big banks. gwen, i think it tells us more about the end of the era of kind of this force conglomeration of bank where's bigger is naturally better. you have seen, obviously, too big to fail banks become too bigger to fail, such as j.p.morgan, or wells fargo which bought wachovia. but there are others who find they can't hit their stride with the asset they say accummed a decade ago. >> ifill: what we're watching happening at citigroup. does that make them an outlier or a sign of things to come? >> i think it's a little bit of both. citigroup, let's not forget, had to go in for two rounds of bailout money. there was even scuttlebut that the white house suggested this was a bank that should fail, that it was beyond rescue. it still has $1 fent billion of bad seeftz its sheets it's looking to get rid of. there are no easy answers for it. there is no overnight turnaround. and at the same time, it's a public company and shareholders are saying, "show me the progress." >> ifill: roben farzhad of "bloomberg business week," thank you
, the country created 146,000 jobs, exceeding expectations in the wake of hurricane sandy. further progress will be tested as the fiscal cliff deadline approaches without a deal inside yet. i'm very pleased to have jeff immelt back on this program. welcome >> charlie, thanks, good to be back with you. >> rose: we've talked many times about g.e. since you took over, i think once since -- just after 2001. where is the company today in terms of where do you want it to be and where do you want it to be in the next five years? >> i think, charlie, what we've tried to do is simplify the portfolio into infrastructure and financial services. we like where the portfolio is today. we think in the infrastructure space there's going to be roughly $4 trillion spent each year, so it's an attractive big market. globally is where our opportunities are so the company's -- probably a decade ago 30% of our revenues were outside the united states. now it's more like 60% or 65%. so we think we've got the portfolio we want. we've dramatically increased the amount of technology. and in the end i think technology
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)